Harper’s Ferry, West Virginia – John Brown’s Raid

 

 

Harpers Ferry, West Virginia is arranged in a profound valley at the conjunction of the Shenandoah and Potomac Rivers. George Washington believed it to be the ideal spot to have the Southern Arsenal and ordnance. It turned into an extremely modern town with north of 3,000 occupants making rifles and ammo.

 

In 1859 John Brown and 21 partners took the town, trusting that the slaves would defy their lords. His was a disastrous move for two reasons. First you can’t hold a town of 3,000 irate inhabitants with just 21 men. Second, the slaves didn’t take the snare. Colonel RE Lee and J.E.B Stuart accompanied the US Marines to retake the town. Jeb went to Brown’s improvised post, the fire station, with papers for give up. At the point when Brown denied Jeb tossed down his resplendent cap as a sign to assault. The rest is history.

 

At the point when Virginia withdrew from the Union, the lead representative needed to assume control over the armory at Harpers Ferry. Leader Jones, the commandant of the armory, had different plans. He exploded the spot and annihilated the vast majority of the weapons and ammunition. Since the essential business was gone, the  38 super ammo for sale of inhabitants in the town dropped to 300, which it is today. The town today is a mix of authentic park and real working town, whose significant industry today is the travel industry. Youngsters in period dress give living history in a significant number of the structures in the authentic park.

 

During the conflict, Harpers Ferry was an essential property. It was at the northern edge of the southern breadbasket, the Shenandoah Valley and the entry toward the northern territories of Maryland and Pennsylvania and just forty miles from Washington DC. Jackson said that he would rater take Harpers Ferry multiple times as opposed to protect it one time. It was difficult to shield.

 

Two days after the CSA took Harpers Ferry the bloodiest one day skirmish of the conflict occurred a short seventeen miles toward the north at a rivulet called Antietam, or the town of Sharpsburg.

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